Proponents of government education getting testy over #CommonCore, threaten a “knock down drag out fight”.


WDAM reports that state school board member Bill Jones of Petal called opposition to Common Core and the creation of replacement standards “foolish”.

“To undo what we’ve already started doing or start over… is really quite foolish,” said Jones.

Jones said opponents of the standards have “created a myth” that Common Core is controlled by the government and said it is “right near insanity.”

Jones said the Common Core debate has became political to the point of being a campaign issue for some in the state.

“Now they find themselves in order to win a Tea Party Primary, they have to be opposed to standards that are really beneficial to the children of this state,” he said.

Jones said the state board does not plan on moving away from the standards, which are also referred to as College and Career Readiness Standards, and said it will be a “knock down drag out fight if we have to defend what we’ve implemented and what teachers and school districts have fought so hard for the last four years.”

According to the report some Pine Belt area senators said they will vote against the standards in 2015, but others were unwilling to state how they would vote.

Joey Fillingane (R- Dist. 41) and Billy Hudson (R- Dist. 45) said they would vote against the standards if a bill were to come forward in 2015.

Representatives Toby Barker (R- Dist. 102) and Larry Byrd (R- Dist. 104) did not give a yes or no when asked if they supported the standards, but they did both agree that the state needs higher standards.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Proponents of government education getting testy over #CommonCore, threaten a “knock down drag out fight”.

  1. desotocountyreform

    Reblogged this on Inside DCR.

  2. mscpamom

    Mr. Jones needs to read the RttT and NCLB waivers that the MDE prepared and he will know that the federal government is dictating MS policy. It is plainly stated that states must adopt career and college ready standards. Until the creation of CCSS, there were no standards in the US known as “career and college ready” so the only standards that the US Dept of Ed could have been referring to were the CCSS. This requirement in and of itself is a violation of the US Constitution.

    There are several other requirement in the applications that tell states what education policy had to be adopted in order for the application to be considered. I wonder what Mr. Jones thinks of the new regs issues by the US Dept of Ed that for next years waiver that states “The Secretary will amend the regulations governing title I, part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), to phase out the authority of States to define modified academic achievement standards and develop alternate assessments based on those modified academic achievement standards in order to satisfy ESEA accountability requirements.”

    I do agree that MS needs higher standards than were in place before but Common Core was adopted by the state but Common Core is not what it appears to be. Even the owners of the standards know they cannot support their own claims and have thus attached the following to the standards.

    “Representations, Warranties and Disclaimer
    THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS ARE PROVIDED AS-IS AND WITH ALL FAULTS, AND NGA CENTER/CCSSO MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, WARRANTIES OF TITLE, MERCHANTIBILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, NONINFRINGEMENT, ACCURACY, OR THE PRESENCE OR ABSENCE OF ERRORS, WHETHER OR NOT DISCOVERABLE”

    Did you get that part about making no representations that the standards are fit for a particular purpose. My questions is should ANYONE use standards that contain such a disclaimer? I can tell you for sure that CPA’s could not use or depend upon such standards for issuing financial statements. I for one think my child’s educations is just as important as a set of financial statements.

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